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neurosciencestuff:

Better memory at ideal temperature
People’s working memory functions better if they are working in an ambient temperature where they feel most comfortable. That is what Leiden psychologists Lorenza Colzato and Roberta Sellaro conclude after having conducted research. They are publishing their findings in Psychological Research.
Studied for the first timeEveryone knows from experience that climate and temperature influence how you feel. But what about our ability to think? Does ambient temperature affect that too? The little research that has been done on this question shows that cooler environments promote cognitive performance when performing complex thinking tasks. Colzato and Sellaro are the first to investigate whether a person’s working memory works better when the ambient temperature perfectly matches his or her preference.
N-back testTo study the influence ambient temperature has on cognitive skills, Colzato and Sellaro performed tests on two groups of participants. One group had a preference for a cool environment, the other group preferred a warm one. The test subjects had to carry out thinking tasks in three different spaces. In the first the temperature was 25 degrees Celsius (77 Fahrenheit), in the second it was 15 degrees (59 Fahrenheit), and in the third the thermostat was set to 20 (68 Fahrenheit). The thinking task that the subjects had to perform was the so-called N-back task. Different letters would appear one after the other on the computer screen. Subjects had to indicate whether the letter that they saw was the same as the one they had seen two steps earlier.Idea confirmedTest subjects proved to perform better in a room with their preferred temperature. The conjecture is that working in one’s preferred temperature counteracts ‘ego depletion’: sources of energy necessary to be able to carry out mental tasks get used up less quickly. ‘The results confirm the idea that temperature influences cognitive ability. Working in one’s ideal temperature can promote efficiency and productivity,’ according to Colzato and Sellaro.
Zoom Info
Camera
Canon EOS 7D
ISO
400
Aperture
f/5.6
Exposure
1/8th
Focal Length
130mm

neurosciencestuff:

Better memory at ideal temperature

People’s working memory functions better if they are working in an ambient temperature where they feel most comfortable. That is what Leiden psychologists Lorenza Colzato and Roberta Sellaro conclude after having conducted research. They are publishing their findings in Psychological Research.

Studied for the first time
Everyone knows from experience that climate and temperature influence how you feel. But what about our ability to think? Does ambient temperature affect that too? The little research that has been done on this question shows that cooler environments promote cognitive performance when performing complex thinking tasks. Colzato and Sellaro are the first to investigate whether a person’s working memory works better when the ambient temperature perfectly matches his or her preference.

N-back test
To study the influence ambient temperature has on cognitive skills, Colzato and Sellaro performed tests on two groups of participants. One group had a preference for a cool environment, the other group preferred a warm one. The test subjects had to carry out thinking tasks in three different spaces. In the first the temperature was 25 degrees Celsius (77 Fahrenheit), in the second it was 15 degrees (59 Fahrenheit), and in the third the thermostat was set to 20 (68 Fahrenheit). The thinking task that the subjects had to perform was the so-called N-back task. Different letters would appear one after the other on the computer screen. Subjects had to indicate whether the letter that they saw was the same as the one they had seen two steps earlier.

Idea confirmed
Test subjects proved to perform better in a room with their preferred temperature. The conjecture is that working in one’s preferred temperature counteracts ‘ego depletion’: sources of energy necessary to be able to carry out mental tasks get used up less quickly. ‘The results confirm the idea that temperature influences cognitive ability. Working in one’s ideal temperature can promote efficiency and productivity,’ according to Colzato and Sellaro.

delishytown:

J.C.’s Lemon Blueberry Pie
This is one of the amazingly delicious desserts going in my Dad’s cookbook. I waited to make this until yesterday, I didn’t think it would be that exciting. I was wrong, it was so good! This sweet, tangy pie is delectable with every bite. Get your face in this pie right now. 
My Dad’s recipe calls for a graham cracker crust, but I had ground almond flour in the pantry, so I decided to make gluten free almond crust so my Sister could have some. I love the Almond crust! It’s got a buttery, nutty taste that plays against the creamy lemon filling and the fresh bite of fruity, blueberry topping. The whipped cream makes the whole thing extra decadent and it’s fun to use the whipped cream air canister thingy. 
For blueberry topping: The recipe calls for canned blueberry pie filling, but I had a bag of organic blueberries in my freezer so I made it from scratch. In a saucepan, 2 cups frozen blueberries, the juice of 1 lemon, 1 1/2 tablespoons corn starch, 2 to 3 tablespoons brown sugar and a pinch of salt. Simmer until it thickens up and set aside.
Preheat oven to 350.
For the crust, the easiest method is to buy a pre made graham cracker crust, or you could make graham cracker crust from scratch, or do the scratch made Almond crust you see here. Combine 4 tblsp melted butter with 1 1/2 cups ground almond meal, (or 1 1/2 cups ground up Graham crackers) a pinch of salt and 2 tblsp brown sugar. Press into the bottom of a pie dish and up the sides. Bake for 8 - 10 minutes and cool. 
For the lemony filing: Mix 1 can sweetened condensed milk, 3 egg yolks, the juice and zest of 1 lemon. Pour into the pie shell and bake for 12 to 18 minutes until it firms up. Cool. Serve with the blueberry sauce and whipped cream. Yum!! Refrigerate the leftovers if there are any.
Zoom Info
Camera
Nikon D7000
ISO
800
Aperture
f/4
Exposure
1/60th
Focal Length
50mm

delishytown:

J.C.’s Lemon Blueberry Pie

This is one of the amazingly delicious desserts going in my Dad’s cookbook. I waited to make this until yesterday, I didn’t think it would be that exciting. I was wrong, it was so good! This sweet, tangy pie is delectable with every bite. Get your face in this pie right now. 

My Dad’s recipe calls for a graham cracker crust, but I had ground almond flour in the pantry, so I decided to make gluten free almond crust so my Sister could have some. I love the Almond crust! It’s got a buttery, nutty taste that plays against the creamy lemon filling and the fresh bite of fruity, blueberry topping. The whipped cream makes the whole thing extra decadent and it’s fun to use the whipped cream air canister thingy. 

For blueberry topping: The recipe calls for canned blueberry pie filling, but I had a bag of organic blueberries in my freezer so I made it from scratch. In a saucepan, 2 cups frozen blueberries, the juice of 1 lemon, 1 1/2 tablespoons corn starch, 2 to 3 tablespoons brown sugar and a pinch of salt. Simmer until it thickens up and set aside.

Preheat oven to 350.

For the crust, the easiest method is to buy a pre made graham cracker crust, or you could make graham cracker crust from scratch, or do the scratch made Almond crust you see here. Combine 4 tblsp melted butter with 1 1/2 cups ground almond meal, (or 1 1/2 cups ground up Graham crackers) a pinch of salt and 2 tblsp brown sugar. Press into the bottom of a pie dish and up the sides. Bake for 8 - 10 minutes and cool. 

For the lemony filing: Mix 1 can sweetened condensed milk, 3 egg yolks, the juice and zest of 1 lemon. Pour into the pie shell and bake for 12 to 18 minutes until it firms up. Cool. Serve with the blueberry sauce and whipped cream. Yum!! Refrigerate the leftovers if there are any.

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